Wednesday, November 15, 2006

Are You A Cling-On?

Yesterday I was loading up the dishwasher and getting ready to switch it on.  But I was momentarily torn: should I keep the glass I was already using, or put it in the dishwasher?  It was already pretty dirty, but I wanted to put some milk in it to drink while attending various work meetings (by phone).  If I washed it, I'd have to get out a new one, and I'd still have a dirty glass at the end of doing the dishes.  But if I didn't wash it, it'd be even dirtier.

So, no matter what I did, I'd still end up with a dirty glass to put in the sink after doing a load of dishes.  And somehow, that didn't seem "fair" to me.  Yet, when I thought about it further, I realized that there was an important lesson here: a lesson that would impact how I thought about money, time, and... well, just about everything.

Because when I thought about it, I realized that the key issue here was circulation.  It would be better to have a slightly-dirty glass than a more-dirty one.  Putting the old one in the dishwasher would allow me to use a new one.  Sure, the new one would have to wait for the next dishwasher cycle, but by then, it'll be the old one.  Holding up the cycle by clinging to what I have, just means I keep having crappy stuff in the present.

And at that moment, I realized that this was also the source of my habit of not putting things away.  In theory, I'm saving time by having a hundred web browser windows open or a dozen books on my desk, because "I might need them again soon."  But what is really happening is that I am jamming up the flow and circulation by clinging to what I already have in front of me, and in the process reducing my ability to concentrate.  Letting go of the old, on the other hand, will...

Open A Space For The New!

And this is something that applies to anything in your life.  One of the big lessons I've been learning this year, is that if you cling to your money, you don't get any more of it.  After all, you're clinging because you believe money is scarce and hard to come by -- and of course your brain will then comply, and make it so

On the other hand, if you spend money with the intention of making more -- while believing that it will be easy -- then you do in fact make more.  You just have to address the fear that makes you cling.

And the same is true in relationships.  If you cling to a person, you're simply manifesting a belief that you're not desirable -- and creating a similarly self-fulfilling prophecy!  Address the underlying fear, and the need to cling will go away.  And then, whether it's your money or your life (or your husband or wife), that which you desire will come to you, filling the space you've created for it to exist in.

So, don't be a cling-on.  Consider what things you might be afraid to let go of...  and then get rid of the fear.

--PJE

P.S.  Speaking of flow in everyday life, the Pathfinders group just learned in my most recent workshop how to create states of mental and physical "flow", using the power of their "unconscious sense" to quickly get into a "groove" at almost any task.  And next weekend (the 25th) they'll be learning how to leverage other kinds of flow in their personal organization, by controlling the flow of their possessions in space -- and their commitments in time! -- to make the most of their potential, day "in" and day "out".  Unfortunately, it's now too late for you to join the Pathfinders group this year, as registration is now closed.

But don't despair, as I have decided to create three new groups next year, in 2007.  And two of those groups will get FREE access to the recordings of the Seven Days to Live Your Dreams workshops, along with many new workshops, and other valuable membership privileges.  Plus, I'm planning a "Make 2007 Your Best Year Ever" teleworkshop for early January, that will be free for all my existing customers...  as if you needed another reason to buy my book NOW before the last 38 copies are gone forever.